Price Camp SCV Price Camp SCV

Latest Articles

100 articles - pg. 1   2   3   4   5  

Dr. Robert E. Lee Hughes - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Dr. Hughes began serving as Camp Commander in 1928. He had served in many positions within the camp, and was Camp Adjutant in 1923 under Commander Moreno. Others to serve on that staff included: Alcee Stewart, First Lieutenant Commander; Dr.Selden Spencer, Second Lieutenant Commander; W. Scott Hancock, Chaplain; and William Crowdus, Inspector. All of whom at one time also served as Camp Commanders. Dr. Hughes was the son of an old Kentucky family, and a graduate of Barnes Medical College. He was married to Miss Sarah Routzung, and passed away in 1934, after serving as a physician in St. Louis for more than 25 years. He is buried in Lakewood Park Cemetery (headquarters at 76 Grasso Plaza) Sources; Missouri Historical Society, Necrology Files Vol 12 p.76...
Gene Dressel
Water Scott Hancock - Published on March 9, 2019
...     The first Commander of Sterling Price Camp #145. He was born in Franklin County, Virginia on November 19th 1869, the son of Abram Booth and Martha Elizabeth (Walker) Hancock. Lt. Abram Booth Hancock served in Company “E” of the 57th Virginia Regiment CSA, and was also the grand-father of our thirty-second  SCV (1933) Commander-in- Chief Walter Lee Hopkins ( Hopkin’s mother was Mary Ella Hancock) Walter Scott Hancock was educated in the public schools of Danville, Virginia, and graduated from Virginia Military Institute in 1890. He later studied at Hampden-Sidney College (1892-1893) and received an LL.B from the University of Virginia in 1896. He moved to St. Louis, and in 1899 married Anna Spencer, daughter of Dr. Horatio Nelson Spencer M.D. Willi...
Gene Dressel
Judge Richard Brownrigg Haughton - Published on March 9, 2019
...     He was Camp commander in 1900. He was the son of Major Lafayette, and Sarah (Brownrigg) Haughton. Mrs. Haughton was the daughter of Richard Thomas Brownrigg of Columbus, Mississippi (See biography of Camp Commander Brownrigg). All of her male relatives who were old enough to bear arms, even distant cousins, were in the Confederate Army. Mrs. Haughton  passed away in 1905.  Her son Judge R. B. Haughton (the subject of this article) was born on November 24th 1864 in Aberdeen, Mississippi. He attended the State Agricultural and Mechanical College at Starkville, Mississippi. In 1881 he attended the Law  School at the University of Mississippi at Oxford, and graduated first in his class of 1886. He practiced law at Aberdeen til 1888, when he moved to St. Louis...
Gene Dressel
Dr. Patrick Joseph Hardy, M.D. - Published on March 9, 2019
...     The son of Samuel Walker and Mary Patricia (Blesener) Hardy. His Great, great, great uncle, Captain Samuel Hamilton Walker, was a  Texas Ranger  killed in the Mexican War in 1847, for whom the Colt “Walker” pistol is named. Dr. Hardy’s Great -grandfather, Captain John McKim Hardy, served in Company “A” of Colonel Kenton Harper’s Regiment, Virginia Infantry. Capt. Hardy was born on December 15, 1831 in Winchester, Virginia,  died on December 18, 1894 in Staunton, Virginia, and is buried in Thornrose Cemetery in Staunton.       Dr. Patrick J. Hardy is a graduate of St. Louis University Medical School, and served his Internal Medicine Residency at the Washington University Division of St. Louis City Hospital...
Gene Dressel
Edward C. Fisher - Published on March 9, 2019
...Served as Camp Commander around 1925. In 1927 he was serving as 2nd Lieutenant Commander under Commander Joseph Mullen, and in 1928 was elected Missouri Division Commander, a position he held til his untimely death in 1930. In 1928 he also served as Trans-Mississippi Quartermaster under T-M Commander J. Edward Jones.       Edward C. Fisher was the son of Charles Page and Marie (Jerzey) Fisher. He was born in Powhattan County, Virginia on May 2, 1875.  Mr. Fisher was left fatherless at the age of sixteen, and assumed the obligation of helping his mother raise and educate his younger siblings. On this firm foundation of self-sacrifice he built his splendid character.  He began his business career with the Richmond Locomotive Works of Virginia, and in 1901 we...
Gene Dressel
Cornelius Hite Fauntleroy - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Served as Camp Commander in 1912. He was born in Winchester, Virginia, and was the son of Thomas Turner, and Bettie Smith (Hite) Fauntleroy.  He graduated from the Shenandoah Valley Academy, Winchester, Virginia in 1876, and received his M.A. from the University of Virginia in 1884. After graduation he served as assistant professor of Greek at the university. In 1890 Mr. Fauntleroy was admitted to the bar at St. Paul, Minnesota in 1890, and was a junior partner with the law firm of Warner, Richardson, and Lawrence.  In 1897 he moved to St. Louis, and was admitted to the Missouri Bar the following year. On September 5th, 1921, at the age of 52 , Mr. Fauntleroy died of blood poising at St. Luke’s hospital in St. Louis. The blood poisoning was caused by an ...
Gene Dressel
Walter Naylor Davis - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Served as Camp Commander sometime prior to 1939. He is shown as Sergeant at Arms for Sterling Price Camp in the 1921 issue of the Confederate Veteran Magazine (p.156). Walter Davis was born in St. Louis November 29, 1876, and was the son of Judge Alexander  and Alice (Edwards) Davis. Judge Alexander Davis served as a Colonel in the Fifth Division, Missouri State guard, and commanded the brigade at the battles of: Oak Hills, Lexington, and Elk Horn Tavern. He was captured near Osage, Missouri while on recruiting duty, and sent to Gratiot Street Prison. Governor Williard P. Hall granted a parole on the condition that leave Missouri and not participate in the war. In 1863 Judge Davis cast his lot with the denizens of the mining camps of Madison County, Montana where h...
Gene Dressel
Col. Francis Marion Curlee - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Served as Camp Commander beginning in 1914. He was born in Corinth, Mississippi on February 1st, 1877, and was the son of William Peyton, and Mary Elizabeth (Boone) Curlee.  Col. Curlee graduated from the University of Mississippi LL.B in 1902, and practiced law in Corinth, Mississippi til 1905 when he moved to St. Louis. On November 25th, 1915 he married Miss Lucille Straubstadter in Charleston, West Virginia. Miss Straubstadter was a descendant of the St. Cyr family of St. Louis.  The couple had one son, F.M. Curlee Jr. and were divorced in 1930. F.M. Curlee Jr. died in a car wreck on February 22, 1944. Curlee served in the Field Artillery during World War I from 1917 til 1919 where he attained the rank of colonel In 1925 Col. Curlee bought the Nathan Boone ...
Gene Dressel
William W. Crowdus - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Served as Camp Commander in 1955. He was born in 1899, and was married to Virginia Garrett Crowdus. He served as president of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Association during the time that the St. Louis Arch was constructed.. Mr. Crowdus attended Washington University School of Law, and began his career as an attorney in 1922. He was a member of the St. Louis Bar Association, and in 1963 served as Interim United States District Attorney. In this capacity he was involved in the investigation of labor racketeering in the Mid-west. In 1942 Mr. Crowdus was elected President of the St. Louis Bar Association. He was also President of the Lighthouse for the Blind. He passed away at St. Luke’s Hospital after surgery on January 24th 1974 ..............St. Louis...
Gene Dressel
William Horner Cocke - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Served as Camp Commander beginning in 1910. He was born in City Point, Virginia on September 12th, 1874, and was the son of Henry Teller and Elizabeth (Horner) Cocke. He was educated in the Staunton, Virginia Public Schools, and the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, Virginia. He graduated with a Degree in Civil Engineering in 1894, earning the highest honors, and was the recipient of the first “Jackson/Hope” award. He served as the Commandant of Cadets, and professor of mathematics at the Kemper Military Academy, Boonville, Missouri from 1894 til 1897. In 1907 he served as General Manager for the Southern Acid and Sulphur Company (see Joseph Mullen biography). At that time his residence was at 4540 Lindell Boulevard.  The company was sold to Mon...
Gene Dressel
Richard Thomas Brownrigg - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Richard Thomas Brownrigg served as Camp Commander from 1901 til 1904. His Camp adjutant  was W. B. Shields. Mr. Brownrigg  was born in Columbus, Mississippi on August 23rd 1865.  His parents were John and Elizabeth (Yerger) Brownrigg. He was named for his uncle, Major. Richard Thomas Brownrigg, who was killed during the Red River Campaign while serving under Gen. Richard Taylor. Commander Brownrigg  graduated from the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee with a B.S. in 1886, and was admitted to the Missouri Bar Association the following year. He  practiced law most of  his life in St. Louis. On November 2, 1901 he married Miss Helen Reilly of New York, and they had one son, John. . In 1902 he and William Mason formed the Brownrigg an...
Gene Dressel
William L. Atwood - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Served as Camp Commander from 1959 til 1962, and was the son of John Cowan and Georgie Tunstall (Baker) Atwood. His grand-father was Dr. Legrand Atwood, Confederate surgeon and later president of the St. Louis Medical Society. Dr. Atwood was also director of the State Asylum at Fulton, Missouri, and a frequent lecturer at St. Louis University.  In 1892 he was mayor of Ferguson, Missouri. . Dr. Atwood died August 22nd, 1917 and is buried in Fee Fee Cemetery Sources: The Book of St. Louisans 1912 p.28-29  The History of Bridgeton, Missouri “Bridgeton Since 1794"  Fee Fee Cemetery Records  Confederate Veteran Magazine 1918 p.215 ...
Gene Dressel
Chilton Atkinson - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Served as Camp Commander in 1906. He was born in St. Louis on December 10th 1875, and was the son of Dr. Robert C. and Mary Tandy (Bull) Atkinson. His father, Dr. Atkinson was a physician who had served in the 10th Virginia Infantry during the war, and was a well loved and respected physician in St. Louis, who often refused payment for his many services. He died in 1917, and is buried at Bellefontaine Cemetery in an unmarked grave. His son (the subject of this article) was educated at Smith’s Academy, and Washington University  School of Law, graduating LL.B in 1895. He was admitted to the Missouri Bar Association in 1895, and practiced law for the firm of Campbell & Ryan of St. Louis. In 1902 he was elected to serve as Missouri Division SCV Commander, an...
Gene Dressel
Camp Roster : 1998 - Published on March 9, 2019
...     1998 was one of the most momentous years in the history of Sterling camp Price #145. It was this year that we hosted the National Sons of Confederate Veterans Reunion in St. Louis. Most of 1997, and the first half of 1998 was consumed by planning for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Meetings were moved from the Olive Garden Restaurant to a series of various locations, and began to take on the aspect of a traveling circus.  Newsletter editor, Doug Harding was on assignment in Bosnia most of the year, and Commander Sappington initiated a project to donate a 41 volume collection of Confederate publications to several area libraries.  A full size replica of our Camp Banner was reproduced,and a picture of it graces the front and back covers of this booklet. The...
Gene Dressel
Camp Roster : 1996-1997 - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Officers for the 1996-1997 term included; Ollie Sappington - Commander,  Larry Limpus - 1st Lt. Commander,  Bill Feeney - 2nd Lt. Commander, and Col. James Speicher - Adjutant.  A new feature was begun this year at the January meeting. Rather than restrict the meeting to the celebration of Generals Lee and Jackson, it was decided to pay tribute to the many  Confederate Generals who were born that month. In 1996, six Confederate heroes were so honored.  The annual Missouri Division Reunion was once again held in St. Louis. The April 13th 1996 activities centered around Jo Hannon’s Restaurant, and it was a very successful reunion. The Camp sadly announced the passing of Compatriots Phillip S. Brumbaugh, and William K. Gardner this year. Conf...
Gene Dressel
Camp Roster : 1994 - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Ollie Sappington continued to command Sterling Price Camp this year. New officers included; Charles Welsh - 1st Lt. Commander, Dave LeMoyne - 2nd Lt. Commander, Col. James Speicher - Adjutant,  Mike Pierce - Chaplain, and Bill Bowden - Treasurer. The monthly Camp meetings were held at the Olive Garden restaurant on Manchester this year, and attendance was at an all time high. The Camp was nearing 100 members, and growing rapidly. Confederate Memorial Day services were held at Jefferson Barracks on April 30th, and the Camp Jackson Dinner was once again at the Cupples House on May 7th.  Commander Sappington , in keeping with his motto “An active Camp is a growing Camp”, filled 1994 with memorable events.  A new recruiting billboard campaign by N...
Gene Dressel
Camp Roster : 1995 - Published on March 9, 2019
...     The January meeting this year payed tribute to General Robert E. Lee in a  lecture given by John Karel. John is one of our most gifted speakers, and all in attendance agreed that it was an honor to be there. Confederate Memorial Day was held on Saturday April 22 this year, at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, and the Division Reunion was hosted by the A.C. Riley Camp at Sikeston, Missouri. The Camp Jackson Memorial Dinner was held on Friday, May 5th at Jo Hannon’s Restaurant, featuring SCV Commander-in-Chief Robert L. Hawkins III. Adjutant Colonel James Speicher initiated a project to erect a monument on Winsted Hill at Franklin, Tennessee honoring the brave Missourians who gave their lives in that heroic struggle. The memorial was named in honor of our f...
Gene Dressel
Camp Roster : 1993 - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Annual events got off to a rough start in 1993. The January 9th Lee/Jackson Dinner at Columbia, Missouri was the day of one of the worst snow storms to hit Missouri in recent history. The guest speaker, P. Charles Lunsford of Atlanta, Georgia had flown in to St. Louis and was stranded here, so a “rump” session of the Lee/Jackson Dinner was held in Dr. Hardy’s recreation room. An excellent lecture followed, and a good time was had by all in attendance. Mr. Lunsford made an encore performance in Missouri that October at the Annual Secession Day Dinner at Louisiana, Missouri. ...
Gene Dressel
Camp Roster : 1992 - Published on March 9, 2019
...     Commander Hardy continued to serve in 1992, and was instrumental in having Sterling Price camp host the annual Division Reunion in St. Louis County that year. It was held on April 11th 1992 at the historic “Oakland House” in Affton, Missouri. Presiding over the meeting was Division Commander Keith Daleen. At this meeting April 26th was established as Missouri Confederate Memorial Day, Sterling Price Camp donated the flagpole to our Elm Springs National SCV Headquarters, Division “Life” Membership was established, and Dr. Patrick J. Hardy was elected Missouri Division Commander.  That summer Ollie Sappington was appointed to serve as Camp Commander, and Gene Dressel was appointed Commander of the Gen. Bowen MOSB Chapter. On June 12th of that ...
Gene Dressel
Camp Roster : 1991 - Published on March 9, 2019
...     In 1991 the continued success of the reorganized Camp was demonstrated by an increase in membership, and Camp activities. The Special Dinners instituted by Commander Hardy were well attended, and gave a felling of comradery to the Camp. The wives and friends of Camp members  were welcomed at these events, which  greatly expanded the attendance. The Camp Jackson Dinner was held at the historic Cupples House on the Frost Campus of St. Louis University. The Campus was named for Confederate General Daniel Marsh Frost. Monthly meetings were held at Marie Callender’s Restaurant on Manchester. The Camp received the Col. John Q. Burbridge Award for Best Camp and the Major John Newman Edwards Award for Best Newsletter that year. Membership soared from 19 members ...
Gene Dressel
pg. 1   2   3   4   5