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Confederate History
4 Articles
Germanic Surnames in Gray - Published on March 17, 2019
...One of the most overlooked group of soldiers that served in the Confederate Army are those individuals having Germanic surnames. While much attention is made to the large numbers of Germans that served in the Union Army, little is publicized about their southern counterpart or about the descendants of early Germanic immigrants that made it to this country as early as 1714, when the first German colony was established in Orange Co., Virginia. Broadfoot Publishers has recently released on CD RO...     Article Length: Long
Hispanic Confederate Heritage - Published on March 17, 2019
...The names below are only a sample of the total number of Hispanics serving in the Southern army. Nevertheless, it illustrates the significance of the Hispanic contribution to the Confederate armed forces. Alabama Division Commander of the SCV, David Toifel, correctly observes that, "For too many years the Confederate soldier was portrayed only as white, predominately Scots-Irish and Protestant. New studies are not so much changing a myth as they are adding the color and diversity which has ...     Article Length: Long
American Indian Confederate Heritage - Published on March 17, 2019
...     The following are Native American Confederate soldiers, derived from records of the National Archives. This listing is to give the reader a better understanding of  the ethnic variance within the southern ranks. It is far from being a complete listing of Native American Confederates.  Most of the soldiers below had only one traditional Indian name, instead of  a Christian/Anglo first and last names.  Many others not listed had taken on Christian first name...     Article Length: Long
Black Confederates Heritage - Published on March 16, 2019
...     Black Confederates Why haven’t we heard more about them? National Park Service historian, Ed Bearrs, stated, “I don’t want to call it a conspiracy to ignore the role of Blacks both above and below the Mason-Dixon line, but it was definitely a tendency that began around 1910” Historian, Erwin L. Jordan, Jr., calls it a “cover-up” which started back in 1865. He writes, “During my research, I came across instances where Black men stated ...
Scott K. Williams
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