Price Camp SCV Price Camp SCV

Latest Articles

100 articles - pg. 1   2   3   5  

General Price Celebration : September 15, 2019 : Pacific, Missouri - Published on April 4, 2019
...Please Join us for a Celebration of Sterling Price!     Sterling Price Camp #145 is proud to be hosting an event which is open to all SCV members and their guests.     Location Pacific Opera House 220 S 1st St, Pacific, MO 63069 (Click for Directions) Note: Please enter from the south side on E. Orleans Street.   Other entrances are for the Brew Haus which shares the same historic building. Time Sunday, September 15, 2019 12:00 PM - Doors Open 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM - Social Time  / Free Wine Tasting  1:30 PM -  Meal will be Served   Meal Fruit Tray Appetizer Caesar Salad White Pasta Herb Roasted Chicken Roasted Potatoes Green Beans Water and Tea Included Cash Bar Available (F...
Germanic Surnames in Gray - Published on March 17, 2019
...One of the most overlooked group of soldiers that served in the Confederate Army are those individuals having Germanic surnames. While much attention is made to the large numbers of Germans that served in the Union Army, little is publicized about their southern counterpart or about the descendants of early Germanic immigrants that made it to this country as early as 1714, when the first German colony was established in Orange Co., Virginia. Broadfoot Publishers has recently released on CD ROM  a compilation  known as the "Roster of Confederate Soldiers 1861-1865", containing records from the National Archives.  Included in the 1.5 million entries are the soldier's names, rank, and unit/regiment.  This is a survey about the Confederate soldiers bearing ...
Hispanic Confederate Heritage - Published on March 17, 2019
...The names below are only a sample of the total number of Hispanics serving in the Southern army. Nevertheless, it illustrates the significance of the Hispanic contribution to the Confederate armed forces. Alabama Division Commander of the SCV, David Toifel, correctly observes that, "For too many years the Confederate soldier was portrayed only as white, predominately Scots-Irish and Protestant. New studies are not so much changing a myth as they are adding the color and diversity which has always existed in the South to its proper place in our history. "Not only was there diversity in Confederate ranks, but there was a broad racial makeup of Hispanics living in the Old South.  Hispanics, then and now,  include members of European, Indian, African races or even more comm...
American Indian Confederate Heritage - Published on March 17, 2019
...     The following are Native American Confederate soldiers, derived from records of the National Archives. This listing is to give the reader a better understanding of  the ethnic variance within the southern ranks. It is far from being a complete listing of Native American Confederates.  Most of the soldiers below had only one traditional Indian name, instead of  a Christian/Anglo first and last names.  Many others not listed had taken on Christian first names and kept their traditional Indian name as a last names.  (Note: the remark "No First Name" should be ignored, it is not part of the soldier's name.) A har lock  NS 1st Creek Mtd.Vol. Co.F  A po to tubbee 1st Choctaw & Chickasaw Mtd.Rifles 2nd Co.C  A tun...
Black Confederates Heritage - Published on March 16, 2019
...     Black Confederates Why haven’t we heard more about them? National Park Service historian, Ed Bearrs, stated, “I don’t want to call it a conspiracy to ignore the role of Blacks both above and below the Mason-Dixon line, but it was definitely a tendency that began around 1910” Historian, Erwin L. Jordan, Jr., calls it a “cover-up” which started back in 1865. He writes, “During my research, I came across instances where Black men stated they were soldiers, but you can plainly see where ‘soldier’ is crossed out and ‘body servant’ inserted, or ‘teamster’ on pension applications.” Another black historian, Roland Young, says he is not surprised that blacks fought. He explains that “&helli...
Scott K. Williams
Pvt. Elias James : Co E, 4th Alabama "Roddey's" Cavalry : by Scott K. Williams, GG Grandson - Published on March 16, 2019
...     Elias James, born Feb. 4, 1836, enlisted in Co E, 4th Alabama "Roddey’s" Cavalry, CSA. His younger brother, Enoch, also served in this same unit. Elias was severely wounded on Dec 24th 1864, in a skirmish North of Decatur, Alabama. The day they brought him home, it was very cold, and the blood was frozen in his hair. A piece of his skull was shot out and covered with a metal plate by a surgeon. J. A. Taylor, of the same unit, was one of the men who carried Elias home from the battlefield.  "...the yankys is as thick as black birds up hear." --Sgt. Wm C. Hester, Co E, 4th AL Cavalry      The regiment, often operating in widely separated detachments, was nearly all that was keeping the Yankees from crossing South of the...
Scott K. Williams
Capt. William H. Wiseman : Co. G 43rd Tennessee Infantry CSA : Ancestor of Dale Wiseman, Sterling Price Camp, No. 145, St. Louis, Mo. - Published on March 16, 2019
...William H. Wiseman enlisted in Company G, Forty-Third Tennessee Infantry at Mosby Creek, Knoxville, Tennessee on October 19, 1861. This regiment was raised by the Hon. JamesW. Gillespie, of Rhea county, and Assistant Adjutant General under Governor Harris. The regiment was mustered into Confederate service on November 24,1861  and  Wiseman was  elected Lieutenant of company G under Captain James Neff. The regiment did guard duty at the bridges along the East Tennessee, Virginia, and Georgia  rail line during the winter and spring of 61-62. The regiment was re-organized in May and Wiseman was elected Captain of company G.  After several months of extensive drilling at Charleston, the regiment joined General Bragg at Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. The ladies of Mt. Ste...
John Drumghoule Williams : A Texas Partisan Ranger : 8 September 1840 - 17 October 1917 : By Chuck Workman, great grandson - Published on March 16, 2019
...Of his nine children that accompanied Lemuel Hardin Williams (My GGGrandfather) from Kentucky to Texas in 1857, John Drumghoule was the eldest. Born in 1840, he passed his 17th birthday during the first week of the trip, but it is doubtful that there was much of a celebration as there might have been. He had helped his father in the Albany store and was expected to do a man's work on the journey. His younger brother, Francis Irwin, even at the age of twelve, probably helped drive the wagons and kept his eye on their younger siblings. When his father purchased land for a house , John and Francis helped clear enough of the forested property for the structure. They also helped their father clear the land for the new Baptist church, too. (LH Williams donated the property) When Lemuel Wi...
Chuck Workman
Francis Gardere Henderson : Great Great Grandfather of Terry Henderson - Published on March 16, 2019
...     Francis Gardere Henderson was born around 1826 in Baton Rouge, LA. His father was Stephen Henderson and mother, Mary Hardy Reid. He was the oldest of at least 8 children, two others who fought for the south in Louisiana. During his youth in Baton Rouge, he was a member of the Young Whig movement as his father, Stephen was very involved at the state level. His father was a plantation owner, editor of the "Baton Rouge Gazette" and very involved in the politics of the town, including "Town Magistrate" (early name for mayor) from 1836-1838. Francis Gardere Henderson grew up in a very "involved" family. When the call came to reinforce General Zachary Taylor in Mexico, Francis G. was among the first 90 from Baton Rouge to go to his rescue as...
General Joseph E. Johnston : Ancestor of James M. England - Published on March 16, 2019
...     General Joseph E. Johnston was born in Cherry Grove, Va., February 3, 1807, and died in Washington City, D. C., March 21, 1891, in the eighty-fifth year of his age. He was graduated at the United States Military Academy at West Point, in the same class with General Lee, in 1829, and was commissioned second lieutenant of the artillery. His service in military and topographical duty was continuous in that rank until 1836, when he was promoted to first lieutenancy of artillery and made aid-de-camp to General Winfield Scott in the Seminole war. A civil engineer in 1837-38, and in July, 1838, he was appointed first lieutenant in the corps of topographical engineers and breveted captain for gallantry in the Seminole war.      In that war a ball struck him ab...
My Confederate Ancestors : 2nd Lt. John Calvin Welch and Pvt. Joshua David Derryberry - Published on March 16, 2019
...2nd Lt. John Calvin Welch, Co F, 9th Mo. Infantry CSA      John Calvin Welch was born on November the 8th 1840 in what is now Dent county Missouri (for your info. part of Crawford and Shannon counties were subdivided to form Dent Co.)   He was the Son of Thomas Welch and Eliza Reddick Welch who were originally from Tennessee and of Scottish decent.   He was married to Martha Elinder Wofford on Dec. 20th 1866 and they head 7 children.  He enlisted in 1861 with Freemans Company, Missouri state militia for six months, and was captured and taken to Alton Illinois where he was held prisoner until Sept. 1862, when he was exchanged.  Then he enlisted as an Orderly Sgt. in Co. F 9th Mo.Infantry. After the Battle at Pleasant Hill La. in 1864 he was promote...
Steve Chase
Pvt. James Barrington Davis : 34th Texas Calvary - Published on March 16, 2019
...James Barrington Davis was educated in Mt. Sterling, KY and served with Kentucky troops in the Mexican War. Returning home, he worked on the family farm while resuming his education in Law. His father, Josiah Davis died at the age of 50 in 1847. In the mid 1850's James moved to Bonham in Fannin County, Texas where he opened a law practice and on 20 April 1858 married Miss Mary Eliza Beauchamp, formerly of Morgan County, KY, but living in Paris, TX with Harriett Graves Wooten and her husband Dr. T. D. Wooten. The wedding reception took place at the Wooten home. The couple then began housekeeping in Bonham. Mary Eliza would return to the Dr. Wooten's home in January 1860 for the birth of her first child, Martha and a second child, Anne, was born here less than 11 months later. Jam...
Chuck Workman
Pvt. Gilliam Bounds : 3rd Battalion Mississippi State Troops - Published on March 16, 2019
...Gilliam Bounds and wife, Kizziah Nelson  (Seated outside their cabin and displaying their most precious material possessions. Gilliam is holding his shotgun and in left hand, a leash for his favorite coon dog. Kizziah is holding what appears to be the family Bible. They were devoted Christians.) Gilliam Bounds, Pvt., 3rd Btn Miss. State Troops.  Gilliam lived most of his life in Mississippi but did live for a period of time in St. Helen Parish, Louisiana which is just across the State border. He was born Jan. 22, 1822 and died April 6th 1912 at the age of ninety. During his life he was a farmer, trapper and hunter. He had the reputation of having the best coon dog in the county. During one unfortunate night,  this coon dog became engaged in a battle with a very large coo...
Joseph Addison Barber, A Moss Bluff Rebel : Ancestor of Compatriot, David Barber - Published on March 16, 2019
...Joseph "Addison" was born October 27, 1824 in Louisiana. His parents were Samuel B. Barber (born circa 1790 in Hagerstown, MD )  and Elizabeth "Betsy" Barrow. Addison married Emmeline Frances Jackson (born December 9th, 1837, Alabama; daughter of Bill and Polly Jackson) and fathered at least 5 children. Known children are: Anna Melissa BARBER, b. June 5, 1861; Thomas Henry BARBER b. Oct 25, 1864; Augusta Eliza BARBER b. Oct 8, 1869;Martha Laura Jane "Mattie" BARBER b. Nov 29, 1873; and Ruby Amanda BARBER b. Feb 27, 1876. Joseph Addison enrolled in the military on April 10th, 1862, Company F, Spaight's Battalion. He was 36 years old at the time and is listed in the Texas Pensions Records website. The battalion was known as "The Moss Bluff Re...
Recommended Links - Published on March 16, 2019
...Main SCV Links Missouri Division National SCV SCV-Links-for-Adjacent States Beauvoir, Jefferson Davis Home  Tennessee Division SCV Arkansas Division SCV Kentucky Division SCV Oklahoma Division SCV   Alabama Division, SCV Arizona Division, SCV California Division, SCV Florida Division, SCV Georgia Division, SCV Indiana Division, SCV Louisiana Division, SCV Maryland Division, SCV North Carolina Division, SCV Texas Division, SCV South Carolina Division, SCV West Virginia Division, SCV Other-Confederate Webpages United Daughters of the Confederacy Morgan's Men Association Confederate-Regimental Websites of Interest 1st Louisiana Cavalry CSA Thomas Legion of Cherokee and Mountaineers Genealogy/History Pages Missouri USGenWeb Missouri ...
Price's 1864 Missouri Expedition : Report of Maj. Gen. Sterling Price - Published on March 16, 2019
...WASHINGTON, ARK., December 28, 1864. GENERAL: I have the honor to make the following report of my operations in the late expedition into Missouri: I regret to state that the report is meager and incomplete in many of its details, for the reason that Major-General Marmaduke and Briga-dier-General Cabell, who bore so honorable and conspicuous a part in the greater part of the expedition, were captured before its close and are now prisoners in the hands of the enemy, while Major General Fagan, who commanded the Arkansas troops who composed so large a portion of the forces engaged in it, has as yet been unable to make any report; neither have any been received from his subordinate commanders. In conformity with the letter of instructions of General E. Kirby Smith of the 11th of August, ...
Price's 1864 Missouri Expedition : Report of Gen. John B. Clark, Jr. - Published on March 16, 2019
...HEADQUARTERS MARMADUKE'S DIVISION OF CAVALRY, Camp on Red River, Ark., December 19, 1864. COLONEL: I respectfully submit the following as my report of the part taken by my brigade in the late Missouri campaign: My command, known as Marmaduke's cavalry brigade, consisting of Greene's, Burbridge's, Jeffers', Kitchen's, and Lawther's regiments, Wood's battalion of cavalry, and Pratt's battalion of artillery, numbering in effective strength 1,200 men (equipments fair and horses in moderate condition), marched from Tulip, Ark., on the morning of the 31st of August at sunrise on the Benton road as the advance guard of the Army of Missouri. Arriving at the Arkansas River on the morning of the 6th of September, Lawther's regiment in advance, after a s...
Price's 1864 Missouri Expedition : August 29 - December 2, 1864 Itinerary of Price's Army - Published on March 16, 2019
...August 28.--General Price and staff left Camden and marched sixteen miles. August 29.--Marched sixteen miles to Princeton. Fagan and Marmaduke reported. General Price assumed command of cavalry and announced staff. August 30.--Marched nine miles to Tulip. Raining all day. Wood's battalion reported to Marmaduke. Orders left at Princeton for Colonel Harrison. August 31 (Camp No. 4).--Near Claridy's, on Benton road. Sent back two iron guns of Hughey's battery, not having suitable horses. Heard of Shelby cutting railroad twice and capturing 2,500 men and eight companies of the Fifty-fourth Illinois; twenty-five miles. September 1 (Camp No. 5).--On Middle Fork of Saline River; Fagan on right flank toward Benton; eighteen miles. September 2 (Camp No. 6).--Road ro...
Price's Last Missouri Raid - Published on March 16, 2019
...     Gen. Price's raid on Missouri in fall of 1864 caused considerable panic to the Federals within the State. Over 6,000 troops had to be recalled from the looting/burning of Georgia to pursue Gen. Price's 12,000 man cavalry force threatening St. Louis. After leaving Doniphan Missouri on Sept. 20, 1864, Price moved against the Federals in Ft. Davidson at Pilot Knob in hope of capturing vitally needed guns and ammunition for his men. Due to the deep trench before the fortification at Ft. Davidson, Price lost from 800 to 1,000 men in his attempts to rush the fort. In preparation of attacking St. Louis, Price sent a squad of Shelby's cavalry to secure the Cheltenham Post/Telegraph office, which was then only four miles outside of the city. Due to a change of plans ...
Missouri Actions, Battles, Skirmishes, and Engagements - Published on March 16, 2019
...Fact: Missouri ranked third in the most battles/skirmishes during the 1861-1865 war, following Only Virginia and Tennessee. The following is a general but incomplete listing of engagements, extracted from Confederate Military History, Volume 12. 1861 May 10--Missouri Volunteer Militia is captured by Capt. Lyon at Camp Jackson; Federal troops fire upon men women and children in St. Louis. May 10--State Legislature passes military bill to recruit Missouri State Guard and to use all State resources to "suppress rebellion and  repel invasion". May 11--U.S. Reserves (Federal) "Home Guard" Troops fire a second time on a crowd at 2nd Presbyterian Church at corner of Fifth and Walnut Streets in St. Louis. Total of six killed (including four "Home Guard"...
pg. 1   2   3   5